Visit Boston: From Baseball to Beaches

This piece, “Visit Boston” is part of the PlacePass Hometown series, where we feature the hometowns of our employees. Caty from the PlacePass marketing team calls Boston home. 

Boston's community boating facility is the country's oldest operating community sailing center. The brown colored hatch shell, which is partly obscured by trees on the left side of the photo, is the stage for the Boston Pop's Orchestra during the city's Fourth of July celebration and fireworks show.
Visit Boston’s community boating facility which is the country’s oldest operating community sailing center. The brown colored hatch shell, which is partly obscured by trees on the left side of the photo, is the stage for the Boston Pop’s Orchestra during the city’s Fourth of July celebration and fireworks show. Photo credit: Riptor3000/Wikimedia Commons.

With a strong claim as the birthplace of the United States, Boston has it all. The city and surrounding regions are brimming with fun activities to while away the summer days. Whether you’re in Boston for work or leisure, check out this list of some of our favorite things to do in Boston.

Visit Boston and Enjoy a Ballgame at Fenway Park

Fenway Park has been home to the Boston Red Sox for 105 years and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2012 and is currently a pending Boston Landmark.
Fenway Park has been home to the Boston Red Sox for 105 years and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2012 and is currently a pending Boston Landmark. Photo credit: Werner Kunz/Wikimedia Commons.

Tiny Fenway Park sells out almost every night, and tickets—the most expensive in baseball — are illegally scalped at up to a 500% markup (though after games start, prices plummet). But fear not: there are options for snagging choice seats without parting with a first-born. On game days, the box office sells obstructed-view and standing-room tickets beginning at 9am. (Line up early, especially for Sox-Yankees games.)

Obstructed-view seats in the infield are excellent, while standing-room seats offer tremendous views of the field. You can also get tickets a few hours before the game if the team releases the seats held for players’ families. Seat quality varies widely. Avoid sections 1-7, unless you enjoy craning your neck. The best “cheap” seats are sections 32-36 (32—33 are down the left-field line in the outfield, close enough to touch the famed Green Monster). Sections 34-36 have perfect sightlines for watching pitches, but some fans emerge lobster-red from the direct sun on their seats.

Visit Boston and the Lighthouses of Cape Cod

The Nauset Light near Eastham, MA is open for tours on Sundays from May to October and also on Wednesdays during July and August. Lighthouse and homes along the Cape.
The Nauset Light near Eastham, MA is open for tours on Sundays from May to October and also on Wednesdays during July and August. Visit Boston and see the lighthouses and homes along the Outer Cape. Photo credit: Peter K Burian/Wikimedia Commons.

After you visit Boston, make sure to head south to Cape Cod. A tour of Cape Cod’s lighthouses is a way to appreciate the area and its seafaring past. The Chatham Light on Main Street in Chatham sits a few miles south of Shore Road. The light isn’t open to the public, but the lookout area provides a gorgeous view of the “Chatham Break” sandbar.

After checking out Chatham Light, continue north to Eastham to see a lighthouse which was erected in Chatham. A cast iron and brick tower built in 1877, Nauset Light was moved from Chatham in 1923 to Eastham. In 1996 it was moved again, just a few meters further away from the cliff’s edge, this time to rescue it from the erosion of a 60-foot cliff.

Race Point Beach lies at the tip of Cape Cod in Provincetown, MA.
Race Point Beach lies at the tip of Cape Cod in Provincetown, MA. Photo credit: Daniel Schwen/Wikimedia Commons.

After checking out Nauset Light, head west along Cable Road leads to the Three Sisters, three wooden towers originally built in 1892. Only the center tower, “The Beacon” survived, but today all three have been restored.

Next, follow Route 6 north to Truro to see the Highland Light. The grounds include the Highland House Museum, documenting the light’s history. (Lighthouse tours go from 10am to 5:30pm. Admission is $6 and $5 for students and seniors.)

At the tip of the Cape, Provincetown has several offerings for the lighthouse-lover with one notable favorite being Race Point Light. Visitors can reach the historic Race Point Light by a 45-minute hike from Race Point Beach.

Interested in checking out beautiful Fenway Park and the historic lighthouses of Cape Cod? Visit Boston and the surrounding area with PlacePass!

Ready to explore more of the Northeast? Check out our blog post on New York.

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